Last edited by Mor
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of The harm reduction needs of Aboriginal people who inject drugs found in the catalog.

The harm reduction needs of Aboriginal people who inject drugs

The harm reduction needs of Aboriginal people who inject drugs

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Published by National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology in Perth, WA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Australia,
  • Western Australia.
    • Subjects:
    • Aboriginal Australians -- Drug use -- Australia -- Western Australia.,
    • Intravenous drug abusers -- Australia -- Western Australia.,
    • Aboriginal Australians -- Services for -- Australia -- Western Australia.,
    • Intravenous drug abuse -- Australia -- Western Australia.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementDennis Gray ... [et al.].
      ContributionsGray, Dennis, 1947-, Curtin University of Technology. National Drug Research Institute.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV5824.I48 H37 2001
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 105 p. :
      Number of Pages105
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3746674M
      ISBN 101740671414
      LC Control Number2003427291
      OCLC/WorldCa50165373

        CEO of AIVL, Melanie Walker said some of the new regulations and social requirements are impossible for people who use drugs to abide by. “People who use drugs need to attend needle and syringe programs (NSPs) and be able to have ongoing access to the full range of harm reduction, pharmacotherapy and other drug and hepatitis treatments. People who inject or use substances are invited to our harm reduction drop-in group at the Harm Reduction Center. We have snacks, coffee and conversation about reducing the harms that drugs can cause. No judgement, only harm reduction information and caring support for people who use drugs.

      Harm Reduction International is a leading NGO dedicated to reducing the negative health, social and legal impacts of drug use and drug policy. We promote the rights of people who use drugs and their communities through research and advocacy to help achieve a world where drug policies and laws contribute to healthier, safer societies.   In a recent report, evidence of intravenous drug use (IDU) was reported in of countries or territories. Among an estimated million people who inject drugs (PWID), (–) million are women. The percentage of women who inject drugs (WWID) varies substantially across regions, ranging from % to 33% of all PWID. The.

      is intended as a guide to reduce harm for people who use methamphetamine. It lists the most common features of methamphetamine use, ways to reduce harm associated with the use of meth, and strategies for cutting down and quitting. The best way to avoid problems with drugs is to not use them. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at higher risk for acquiring HIV infection than the general population in many countries. Injecting drug use is present in countries including a wide array of low and middle income countries where HIV incidence is growing in recent years - .


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The harm reduction needs of Aboriginal people who inject drugs Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Harm Reduction Needs of Aboriginal People Who Inject Drugs. The harm reduction needs of Aboriginal people who inject drugs. [Dennis Gray; Curtin University of Technology.

National Drug Research Institute.;] -- Reports the results of a study that investigated the nature and extent of illicit intravenous drug use by Aboriginal people in Western Australia and the need for harm reduction services; users. BibTeX @MISC{Gray01theharm, author = {Dennis Gray and Sherry Saggers and David Atkinson and May Carter and Wendy Loxley and Dennis Hayward}, title = {The Harm Reduction Needs of Aboriginal People Who Inject Drugs}, year = {}}.

Research: Youth often use cannabis as harm reduction, may help stop injection drug use. published on Aug New research is shedding light on how cannabis use among some young people may be an important way to reduce the harms of other substance use.

Harm reduction is proven to engage Indigenous people who use drugs with care, treatment and support. This guide provides you with information related to harm reduction services such as needle and syringe programs, safer drug consumption services, opioid substitution therapy (e.g., methadone) and naloxone.

Format: Book booklet. Harm reduction is proven to engage Indigenous people who use drugs with care, treatment and support. This guide provides you with information related to harm reduction services such as needle and syringe programs, safer drug consumption services, opioid.

1 Community Report RESPONDING TO THE NEEDS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS FINDINGS FROM THE RESEARCH PROJECT: ‘Investigating the Impact of Injecting Drug Use in Indigenous Communities in Metropolitan Adelaide’ COMMUNITY REPORT WRITTEN FOR THE ABORIGINAL DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUNCIL (SA) INC JUNE BY CAROL HOLLY, ABORIGINAL DRUG.

The findings of this project support this premise and outline a range of issues that impact on the ability of Aboriginal people who inject drugs to access quality and timely prevention, treatment and harm reduction services, when and where they need them.

Injecting drug use is of increasing concern among Aboriginal peoples (including Torres Strait Islander peoples) and is associated with co-morbidities related to alcohol use, homelessness and poor mental and physical health outcomes, including the increased risk of blood-borne viruses (BBV) such as HIV and hepatitis C.

Needle and syringe programs (NSPs) are known to reduce harm from illicit drugs. Prairie Harm Reduction operates Saskatchewan's First Safe Consumption Site. This service prevents overdoses and other adverse medical effects associated with using drugs by having people use drugs under the observation of a Primary Care Paramedic.

This program is exclusively funded by fundraising dollars. Donate if you are able. Harm Reduction Peer Backpack and Vending Machine Project: Battleford - Saskatchewan Health Authority Through community consultations, this project will share harm reduction supplies via needle vending machines and backpack distribution, and decrease inequalities for people who inject drugs in the project's catchment area.

In times of disaster, including the COVID emergency, it is essential that we consider the needs of people who use drugs (PWUD). Providing a continuity of harm reduction supplies like sterile syringes and naloxone is just as important as providing them with information and support to get through these challenging times.

Women and gender-diverse people who use drugs have long been ignored in conversations about drug policy and the design of harm reduction strategies. But as a group of women who use drugs declared in a statement on International Women’s Daythere must be a “complete reform and transformation of the current system of prohibition”.

Harm Reduction Coalition advances policies and programs that help people address the adverse effects of drug use including overdose, HIV, hepatitis C, addiction, and incarceration.

The territory will expand drug testing capacity and provide drug users with kits for crack cocaine and injection use as well as methamphetamine pipes as part of its harm-reduction approach, she said.

"We need to keep working to reduce the stigma of a drug-related death. Creating supervised settings for people who inject drugs, so they can be revived if they overdose or receive information about local treatment options, including referral.

Distributing sterile injecting equipment to reduce the spread of blood-borne viruses like HIV and Hepatitis C.

exchanges for injecting drugs. In spite of the controversy that surrounds harm reduction, one element remains constant: there is a wide disparity of understanding across the country and in various groupings, including among Aboriginal peoples, of what harm reduction is, and its value as a promising practice for Aboriginal social work.

Harm reduction works because it is driven by affected communities and science. It is compassionate, pragmatic and non-judgmental as it accepts people for who they are, where they are at and listens to what people need.

Harm reduction is effective and cost-effective health, social and economic policy. The AODconnect app has been developed by the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre to help alcohol and other drug (AOD) workers, community members and health professionals working in the AOD sector to locate culturally appropriate services.

The app aims to support efforts to reduce harmful substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Harm minimisation has underpinned the Australian National Drug Strategy for over 20 years and incorporates three approaches: supply reduction, demand reduction and harm reduction.

In Canada, Indigenous people experience higher rates of injection drug use and less access to health care than non-Indigenous people. For many Indigenous people, drug use offers a means of coping with traumatic life circumstances, including those related to their experiences with the residential school and child welfare systems in Canada, legacies of colonialism and racism, and .Gladys is a Harm Reduction Nurse at Medecins Du Monde-France, Kenyan Program, with a wide knowledge and experience in implementing harm reduction intervention for people who use drugs with a specific focus for Women who use drugs.

She holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Public Health from Kenyatta University.DRUG USER INVOLVEMENT - Harm reduction acknowledges that people who use drugs are the best source for information about their own drug use, and need to be empowered to join the service providers to determine the best interventions to reduce harms from drug use.